Dec 13th, 2017

Get to Know the JWT Honorees from the 4A's 100 People Who Make Advertising Great

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In July, the 4A's revealed their 100 People Who Make Advertising Great honorees.

Included on this list were three of our own from JWT New York - Jessica Toye, Art Director; Keni Thacker, Senior Event Technology Specialist; Emely Perez, Senior Designer.

We sat down with the honorees to learn more about their take on the advertising industry.

What do you love about advertising? What do you like the least about advertising?

Jessica Toye

I love creating things that have never been done, while rooting it in strategy to get the client to embrace groundbreaking ideas. I hate the process, from re-briefs to research, anything that slows down projects.

Emely Perez

Advertising is a platform that requires the constant pursuit of knowledge on a wide range of subjects. To better understand our clients, we are asked to understand their respective industries, the people that interact with these industries and how they perceive things. Every project is an opportunity to learn something new and I love that. I would say that I hate to see advertising that feels out of touch with people in the cultures they are trying to appeal to. Cultures that are apparent that the brand/agency do not properly understand. A mistake as simple as using slang words incorrectly. Now, I don't believe that advertising should stay away from this kind of topic, but I do feel that in some situations we need to dig a little deeper and ensure we go beyond a strategy slide to understand the people we are talking to.

Keni Thacker

I think what I love the most about advertising is being on the ground level of a project, aiding and watching it come to fruition from a simple idea. I also love the camaraderie I’m able to build with my teams and the client to make something amazing that will touch people’s lives. Honestly, I hate the unconscious naiveté. For a long time, I've felt that some people assume they know everything when it comes to creating work with minimal research or simply asking questions about certain demographics. This cycle has unfortunately led to decades of misrepresentation of people.

What's the next "big thing" in advertising that people will be talking about?

Jessica Toye

Campaigns won’t start with TV budgets and trickle down to everything else. As millennials grow older TV will become the afterthought.

Emely Perez

People all over the world are stressed out. Considering the current social climate and the continued social disputes about race, gender, immigration and so on, people are getting more and more overwhelmed by it all. They are constantly reminded of these issues by the phones. I think that this love/hate relationship with technology can potentially influence advertising escapes or simplified digital experiences that will allow them to finally unplug.

Keni Thacker

This business is in a constant state of evolution so I’m not quite sure what the next “big thing” will be. As much as I love tech and am interested in it, I’m hoping the lines drawn between cause marketing related advertising and regular advertising will become more blurred. So that different types of tech can be used by brands to help better our society.

What one ad or campaign (that you had nothing to do with) changed the way you see advertising? Why?

Jessica Toye

The anti-Super Bowl campaign for Newcastle Brown. It poked fun at one of the biggest marketing days of the year and hijacked the conversation around the Super Bowl without having to spend $6 million dollars.

Emely Perez

The Truth anti-smoking campaign is one of the most memorable campaigns from my childhood. As a young girl, I did not pay much attention to ads unless they were immediately entertaining. But when I watched the Truth commercials, they held my attention and the take-away was more than the usual catchy jingle. These commercials scared me, made me feel grateful that my loved ones were not smokers, and were a constant reminder that I never would smoke. The Truth campaign showed me how powerful advertising could be.

Keni Thacker

I’m a big fan of branded content especially with a purpose. So I’d have to say my favorite campaign would be Dewar’s [Live True] Profiles. What I love about this series is the style of filming making they used which was simplistic yet slick. I also thoroughly enjoyed the diversity in profiles and how they tied it back to the brand. The essence was smooth and never forced.

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